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International Cultivar Authority Registry Of The Genus Viola

SECTION I a.
Traditional Single Flowered Violets

V
Velvet Beauty - Violette de Constantinople


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Velvet Beauty - Origins unknown.

Dark violet flowers with a yellow eye.

No scent.


Victoria - See 'Czar Bleu'.


Victoria Regina - Geo Lee, Clevedon (Avon) UK. 1873.

The original was a true 'Russian' violet, a cross between 'Czar' and 'Devoniensis' raised by Geo Lee in 1873. This version is the one discovered by Jean Burrows on the site of Lee's old nursery and as close to the description of the original as to be more or less exact. Large violet- purple flowers, which are said to fade to dark blue with age.

An early violet with long stems forming a sturdy medium-sized plant.


Victoria Regina-George Lee The name is not valid as these are two distinct cultivars, 'Victoria Regina' and 'George Lee', respectively.


Victory - F. J. Graham, Cranford (Middlesex) UK. 1870.

Purple flowers, described as larger and better shaped than 'Czar', and with more fragrance.


Victory Violet - Raised by Edith Pawla, Capitola, California, U.S.A. Date unknown.

Giant rich velvety violet flowers, which can be up to 2.5 inches across on stems up to 12 inches long.

Very sweet fragrance.


Vilmoriniana - See 'Sulphurea'.


Violet Lady Dr Judith McLeod, Honeysuckle Cottage Nursery, NSW Australia.

Dark violet flowers and vigorous.

Very fragrant.


Violette de Constantinople - See, 'Wilson'.


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